Workshop & Town Hall: Cures for Climate Confusion

November 17, 2011

YOU ARE INVITED TO A CLIMATE CHANGE TOWN HALL DISCUSSION
Hosted by the Erb Institute for Global Sustainable Enterprise and the Union of Concerned Scientists

PUBLIC TOWNHALL FRIDAY EVENING, Friday  January 20, 6:30 – 8:00 pm
Cures for Climate Confusion: Breaking Through in our Neighborhoods and in the Nation
Blau Auditorium at the University of Michigan Ross School of Business, 701 Tappan Street
Town Hall Discussion and Keynotes: Summary and Key Findings of Friday Workshop with Q & A

In attendance will be many innovative thinkers and experienced leaders from the media, academic institutions, religious centers, the private sector, and other fields.  Opening remarks from former U.S. Representative Robert Inglis, R-SC.

Town Hall Discussion, question and answer on ways to increase public understanding of the climate change debate

Speakers:
Rep. Bob Inglis, former US Congressman (R-SC)
Rev. Canon Sally Bingham, President, Interfaith Power and Light,
Steven W. Percy, former CEO of BP America (retired 1999)
Andrew Hoffman, Director, Erb Institute for Global Sustainable Enterprise, University of Michigan
Peter Frumhoff, Director of Science and Policy, Union of Concerned Scientist

Moderator:
Tim Mealey, Co-Founder and Senior Partner, Meridian Institute

How to participate:  Participate in person or view the live streamed event.

PRIVATE WORKSHOP BY INVITATION, January 19-21
Increasing Public Understanding of Climate Risks and Choices: What We Can Learn from Social Science Research and Practice
Thursday, Jan 19: Dinner and Keynotes
Friday, Jan 20: How Practitioners and Social Scientists Inform the Public Understanding of Climate Change (moderated discussion)
Saturday, Jan 21: The Future of Social Science Research and the Climate Debate (moderated discussion)
More information for workshop participants to follow

Workshop Goals:

(a) Build a shared understanding of the key challenges constraining US public understanding of climate risks and choices;
(b) Identify the current findings of social science research on public understanding of climate change and their practical applications;
(c) Identify the applicable lessons from social science research and practice into reducing historically or current large gaps between scientific and public understanding on other issues (health risks of tobacco, autism risks of vaccines, etc).
(d) Identify best practices and opportunities to strengthen the integration of social science research and practice in improving public understanding of climate risks and choices.


WE ARE GRATEFUL TO OUR CO-HOST:

AND OUR U-M CO-SPONSORS

  • Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences (AOSS)
  • Graham Environmental Sustainability Institute
  • School of Natural Resources and Environment
  • Michigan Memorial Phoenix Energy Institute
  • The Great Lakes Integrated Sciences and Assessments Center (GLISA)